5 Sophia School Corporation

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Sophia School Corporation Overview

5-1-1  Enrollment capacity

5-1-2  Cumulative number of graduates

5-1-3  Number of staff members

The number of full-time staff members (Directors, Deputy Directors, Technical Experts, Team Leaders, and Officers) has remained at an average of around 250 during the past decade. The increase observed in AY2011 is a result of merging with Seibo Gakuen. The increase seen in AY2014 is due to the reorganization of administration and the establishment of the Office of Global Education and Collaboration, and the Office of Language Education under the Bureau of Academic Affairs.
Given the diversification of administrative tasks, the number of nonregular staff members has increased by 70 over the past decade, resulting from promoting employment of persons with disabilities, diversification of the business field, and promoting direct employment of temporary staff members for enhancing the operational system.
Contract staff members have not been recruited since AY2015.

5-1-4  Age distribution of staff members

The average age of staff members (full-time, nonregular) has been in the early 40s over the past decade.
Broken down by age group, although the number of staff members in their twenties has increased slightly in the past three years, the enhancement of staff members in their twenties is an urgent issue.

Sophia School Corporation Financial Situation

5-2-1  Ordinary Expense Subsidies for Private Universities

Competitive factors such as university reform, comprehensive support projects, and private university research branding projects, etc., are increasing subsidies for current expenses of private universities. The amount of subsidies this year was 2,536 million yen for universities (a decrease of 80 million yen from the previous year), and 52 million yen for junior colleges.

5-2-2  MEXT grants

(1)Grants under Project for Establishing Core Universities for Internationalization
Since AY2009, Sophia University has gained recognition for its globalization efforts and has been granted subsidies under the MEXT-led “Project for Establishment University Network for Internationalization (Global 30),” the “Project for Promotion of Global Human Resource Development,” the “Re-Inventing Japan Program” and the “Top Global University Project.” In AY2015, Sophia University was also selected for the “Re-inventing Japan Project (Support for the formation of Collaborative Programs with Universities in Latin America).” In AY2018, Sophia University was selected for the “Re-inventing Japan Project (Support for the formation of Collaborative Programs with Universities in the U.S. utilizing COIL type education).”

(2)Subsidies for facilities, equipment and devices
In FY2008-2010, seismic reinforcement work was undertaken at the Yotsuya and Hadano campuses, supported by annual subsidies of 223 million yen in AY2010.
Sophia University received 86 million yen as Private School Facilities Disaster Relief Subsidy in AY2011, and 191 million yen as Private School Facilities Expenses Subsidy in AY2013.

(3)Other government subsidies
Other government subsidies include the Interest Subsidy and the Subsidy for Promoting University Reform. In AY2012, the Subsidy for Development of Human Resources in Science and Technology was terminated, thus resulting in a decreasing trend in government subsidies.

5-2-3  Statement of revenue and expenditure

In AY2019, the balance of the current year after transfer to capital funds increased by 1,406 million yen compared with the budget to 4,346 million yen. Consequently, the balance to be carried forward to the next year decreased by 30% to negative 10,116 million yen.
A noteworthy matter of the settlement this year is large-scale special income and expenditure. This includes approximately 12,100 million yen of income from the sales of assets (land) by the sale of the Ichigaya campus, 340 million yen of net loss on disposition (building and structure) by such sale, 209 million yen of net loss on disposition by the replacement and renewal of ancillary facilities of Buildings No. 3, 4, 8, and 9, and 416 million yen of net loss on disposition of equipment and fixtures for education and research, equipment and fixtures for institutional administration, and books. In addition, of the expenditure related to the construction of Buildings No. 3, 4, 8, and 9 launched in AY 2013, 571 million yen was transferred to other special expenditure as demolition expenses, removal expenses, and other expenses. Consequently, the total special expenditure amounted to 1,837 million yen.

5-2-4  Cash flow statement

The scale of the cash flow statement increased by 9,828 million yen compared with the budget to 67,200 million yen. Major factors are an increase in income from investment of assets (proceeds from sales of investment securities) in terms of income and an increase in proceeds from collection of profit-making business by 6,936 million yen in terms of other income due to transfer of the item of Building No. 13 from profit-making business accounting to school corporation accounting.
In terms of expenditure, noteworthy matters are an increase in repayment of loans due to purchase of land and buildings for Building No. 14, increase in payment for land by 3,956 million yen for acquisition of Building No. 13 and Hadano Maria Residence, and 2,441 million yen in payment for construction in progress expenditure (repair of Buildings No. 3, 4, 8, and 9).
Consequently, cash and equivalents carried over to the next year increased by 443 million yen compared with the previous year or by 2,591 million yen compared with the budget.

5-2-5  Balance sheet

In AY2019, there were significant changes in tangible fixed assets. Total assets increased by 7,034 million yen compared with the end of the previous year to 164,135 million yen. Major factors in the increase in assets are transfer of the item of Building No. 13 on the Yotsuya campus from profit-making business accounting to school corporation accounting, removal of Buildings No. 3, 4, 8, and 9 on the Yotsuya campus associated with the progress of repair work, and the sale of the Ichigaya campus.
In terms of liabilities, long-term loans payable increased by 1,500 million yen due to purchase of Building No. 14 on the Yotsuya campus, and prepaid tuition and other deferred credits decreased by 1,152 million yen due to transfer to short-term loans payable that is to become due for repayment within one year. Short-term loans payable, amounted to 3,500 million yen, was repaid in full this year. The decrease in prepaid tuition and other deferred credits includes 2,490 million yen from deposit for the sale of land of the Ichigaya campus received in AY2018.
In terms of net assets, capital funds increased by 8,414 million yen to 147,885 million yen, and the balance carried forward to the next year improved by 4,348 million yen to negative 10,116 million yen.

5-2-6  Donations

The Corporation has taken over fund-raising activities for the 100th anniversary of the foundation, which has been carried out for about ten years until AY2013. Since AY2014, it has developed the “SOPHIA Fund for the Future” as constant new fund-raising activity. The Fund aims to establish a stable fiscal foundation for carrying out education and research activities, global human resource training activities, student support, and campus development plan, etc. In the sixth year in AY2019, the amount of donations was about 530 million yen.
✽In AY2016, in-kind donations (about 21.5 billion yen) increased significantly due to the corporation merger.
(million yen)